Nicholas Reading’s LOVE & SUNDRIES Coming October 10th

 

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After months of seeking the poetic voice of Split Lip, we stumbled upon poet Nicholas Reading, who writes narratives in verse that haunt, upset and sadden their readers––a perfect, almost too perfect, fit for a punk rock publisher called Split Lip Press. “We’ve had the privilege of publishing a number of gifted poets in Split Lip Magazine,” says Editor-in-Chief J. Scott Bugher. “All of them contributed works that come with a hard punch, but when the press started recruiting a variety of poets with hopes of finding a manuscript that truly sets the poetic bar for Split Lip Press, our hopes were satisfied upon reading Nick’s manuscript, Love & Sundries.” Reading, an active writer and editor in the literary scene, agreed to take up the press’ offer upon looking into what the press was all about. On Split Lip, Reading says, “Writers of great caliber respect J. Scott Bugher, his mission and unwavering enthusiasm for publishing work that matters. That pushes. That asks the audience to not only read and enjoy, but to sleep with it. Wake with it. Live with it. And when you die, remember it. Split Lip isn’t in the game for itself as much as it is obsessively focused on presenting a platform for some of the best voices, veteran or emerging, in contemporary literature. Split Lip won’t settle for less. If anyone says otherwise Bugher and his editors will have some choice words and will not go gently into any good night without a fight.”

Love & Sundries will be available October 10th via www.splitlippress.com & www.amazon.com.

Listen to Nicholas Read An Account of Extreme Weather.

About Nicholas Reading:

Nicholas Reading earned an MFA in Fiction at Purdue University and an MFA in Poetry at Virginia Commonwealth University. He is the author of the chapbook The Party In Question (Burnside Review Press, 2007). His poetry has appeared or is forthcoming in Bat City Review, jubilat, Nimrod, Painted Bride Quarterly, and San Pedro River Review. He also serves as the Managing Editor for Sport Literate. His most recent chapbook, Love & Sundries is schduled to release by Split Lip Press on November 15th, 2014.

About Split Lip Press:

A former top Nashville session musician, J. Scott Bugher bases Split Lip Press on the modern music industry, where recording artists understand major label record deals are things of the past, which has triggered the rise of indie labels releasing the best music out there. Bugher feels like publishing is evolving similarly. “For some reason, writers have sat on manuscripts for up to a decade while paying up to thousands in reading and contest fees, hoping for a major book deal,” says Bugher. “Why hold onto a manuscript for that long and pay that much when you can partner with a determined and passionate small press?” Though Split Lip can only do so much, the bookmaker believes small press publishing is the new world order for the literary scene.

For more information on Nicholas Reading, visit www.nicholasreading.com.

For more information on Split Lip Press, visit www.splitlippress.com.

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Split Lip: The Origin of Our Name

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by J. Scott Bugher

Some have asked how I came up with Split Lip as the name for the press and magazine. Kind of funny, too. Literary analysis geeks have tried to figure out the correlation between our brand name and the content we publish. Here’s a hint: There is no correlation, so go take a breather and get back to cracking the codes of Jack London and Kate Chopin because there’s nothing to analyze up in here. Anyway, the name – Am I a Split Lip Rayfield fan? Not exactly. Do I enjoy the sight of blood dripping from one’s mouth. Nope. Am I big fat copy cat who is stuck in the early 90s? Yep.

Twenty years ago, I was active in the Indianapolis hardcore underground music scene, a bunch of pissed off kids onstage playing guitar and screaming into microphones or offstage moshing in the pit, the hardcore equivalent of line-dancing. I spent a lot of time at a local punk venue, The Sitcom, listening to Jackhammer, Shelter, Birthright, Endpoint, et cetera, and I liked it. I liked things loud. I liked to get injured in the mosh pit. I liked the angst of it all. And I really liked my favorite band from back then: the Split Lip, a band that produced one of my favorite records, For the Love of the Wounded, a record I still spin today.

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Split Lip, 1992

Besides their music, I am inspired by the longevity of the band. While most bands of that era came and went like Little Caesars’ employees, Split Lip continued. Of course they outgrew their days of teenage punk, but instead of throwing in the towel, they grew up and moved on to name themselves Chamberlain and punk became an influence on their music rather than a definition. Guitarists Adam Rubenstein and Clay Snyder pawned off their DOD metal distortion pedals in exchange for Ibanez Tube Screamers and let go of their solid-state Crate rigs for lower wattage tube amps. Bassist Curtis Mead stopped strumming power chords and developed a more melodic approach to the bass, much like Carol Kay. Their almighty drummer, Charlie Walker, stowed away his chops and laid down the boom pop, boom boom pop grooves. Lastly, vocalist David Moore stepped up as a front man, dropped his screaming and developed a unique voice with hints of Springsteen and Petty present in it. I hate categorizing music, but think Goo Goo Dolls meets Dire Straits? Something like that? Kind of? Or Springsteen meets The Screaming Trees? I don’t know. I’ll give you a hint, though. They did not sound like Los Lonely Boys.

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Split Lip / Chamberlain 2011: Reunited after a six-year hiatus.

So, Chamberlain did their thing for a good while – up until the early 2000s. But all good things come to an end. The band called it quits in 2005. BUT. David Moore and Adam Rubenstein continued to write and catalog music, which resulted in David Moore’s solo record, My Lover, My Stranger, another one of my favorite records, along with Adam Rubenstein’s Excavator, another great record. Drummer Charlie Walker has also maintained a presence in the music industry as drummer for Bush and Helmet.

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David Moore’s Solo Record: My Lover, My Stranger

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Adam Rubenstein’s Solo Record: Excavator

I could write more on the evolution of these musicians, but I wanted to make it clear that not only did I name the magazine Split Lip because I thought it would sound cool; I named it after a band that represents birth, progress and longevity–my hopes for the magazine.